Menu Menu Previous Interview Question Next Interview Question Search print thumbs-down thumbs-up Check Square bookmark arrow-right MockQuestions.com Logo MockQuestions MockQuestions.com Logo MockQuestions
Job interview preparation
Sign in
Upgrade
Career Interviews
Interview Topics
Company Interviews
Close

Top 30 Paramedic Interview Questions

What was your schedule at your last position? Are you okay adjusting to a new shift?
Professional Answer
View our answers!
Upgrade
Upgrade to view Answers
Question 2 of 30
What are a few traits you think a paramedic needs to have?
Professional Answers Preview
In thinking about the nature of the job, try to focus on the key qualities that make a good paramedic. Sound judgement, passion for medicine and a love for helping people are all important qualities. Dedication, reliability and intelligence are also highly important. As you prepare for this interview, create a list of qualities that correspond to the responsibilities of the job description. For example, filling out patient care reports requires a person to be detail oriented and consistent. Assessing patients and identifying next steps requires knowledge and good judgement. What do you think are the most important traits from your experience?
More professional answers available after the upgrade
Upgrade
Question 3 of 30
How would you handle working with a teammate with less experience that caused you to carry the workload?
Professional Answers Preview
It's likely that this situation will occur, especially considering the differing levels of experience between EMT's and Paramedics. You will have more varying types of responsibilities as a Paramedic and may be partnered with an EMT with much less experience. How will you handle it? How have you handled this type of scenario in the past? You'll be spending quite a bit of time with your partners on the job, so strategy will be important if you're faced with this type of challenge. You may want to see this as a teaching opportunity. If your partner is interested in learning more, perhaps you can help them advance in their knowledge. Communication will be vital. If your teammate is receptive, perhaps you can tell them what you observe to be happening and see how the two of you can remedy the situation. Your interviewer wants to know that you are a team player, even if your teammate is dragging you down. So put on your thinking cap! How can you communicate effectively with your teammate to boost that relationship to build a power team?
More professional answers available after the upgrade
Upgrade
Question 4 of 30
What can you bring to the job that exceeds what other candidates can bring?
Professional Answers Preview
What makes you stand out? You may have shown your knowledge and expertise through answering some tough questions about the types of scenarios you might anticipate. Now's the time to talk about your strengths, accomplishments and how you will do an outstanding job above the rest. The average paramedic might meet the responsibilities and basic qualifications, but you have more to offer than that! Talk about how you trained your partner on a new routine procedure or how you implemented a new system that improved the transport process, ultimately saving time and lives! You may have more meager accomplishments but even the little things like having a great attitude can make a huge difference.
More professional answers available after the upgrade
Upgrade

Practice More Interviews

Behavioral
We all have some behaviors that are typical of us and which sometimes results in ...
Common
There are some questions that employers ask at almost every interview. The questions ...
Communication
Communication skills are essential for any workplace to function efficiently. However, ...
Leadership
If you are interviewing for any type of leadership role; prepare with our leadership ...
Management
Our management questions are designed for any interview for a position that has authority ...
Teamwork
This set of questions aims to ascertain what your idea of teamwork is and whether ...

Related Career Interviews

Nursing
As a Nurse, you are a healthcare professional that serves on a multidisciplinary team to provide care and education to patients and their families. A few of your duties include performing physical exams ...
Physician Assistant
Physician Assistants are healthcare professionals who are licensed to provide a broad range of healthcare services under the supervision of a licensed physician. Physician Assistants or PAs are licensed ...
Law Enforcement
Law enforcement agents are committed to upholding the law within a particular jurisdiction. They remain focused on protecting life and property. Police officers, detectives, and patrol officers are all ...
Medical Assistant
A Medical Assistant helps prepare a patient for examination by a physician. They will perform basic vital functions, weight measurements, height measurements, room a patient, and assist the patient until ...
Firefighter
Firefighters are trained to respond to different types of emergencies, ranging from fires, flooding and chemical spills to car crashes and water rescue operations. Their main aim is to rescue humans and ...
View More Careers
Question 5 of 30
What motivates you?
Professional Answer
View our answers!
Upgrade
Upgrade to view Answers
Question 6 of 30
Tell me how you remain calm, in detail, during a crisis?
Professional Answer
View our answers!
Upgrade
Upgrade to view Answers
Question 7 of 30
How do you handle death?
Professional Answer
View our answers!
Upgrade
Upgrade to view Answers
Question 8 of 30
How do you build relationships when you join a new team?
Professional Answer
View our answers!
Upgrade
Upgrade to view Answers
Question 9 of 30
How would you intervene with a frantic relative who is grieving over the injury of a child?
Professional Answer
View our answers!
Upgrade
Upgrade to view Answers
Question 10 of 30
Have you ever suggested a improvement that was put into practice in the paramedic field?
Professional Answer
View our answers!
Upgrade
Upgrade to view Answers
Question 11 of 30
How do you resolve conflict with co-workers?
Professional Answer
View our answers!
Upgrade
Upgrade to view Answers
Question 12 of 30
24/7 operations are like relay races where you take the baton, run with it and then pass it on smoothly. How do you make seamless transitions on shift changes?
Professional Answer
View our answers!
Upgrade
Upgrade to view Answers
Question 13 of 30
What gives you the greatest joy as a Paramedic?
Professional Answer
View our answers!
Upgrade
Upgrade to view Answers
Question 14 of 30
What drew you to emergency medicine?
Professional Answer
View our answers!
Upgrade
Upgrade to view Answers
Question 15 of 30
Tell me about a mistake you made at work. How did you handle it?
Professional Answer
View our answers!
Upgrade
Upgrade to view Answers
Question 16 of 30
Tell me about yourself.
Professional Answer
View our answers!
Upgrade
Upgrade to view Answers
Question 17 of 30
What is your greatest achievement so far?
Professional Answer
View our answers!
Upgrade
Upgrade to view Answers
Question 18 of 30
What part of your duties as a Paramedic do you dislike the most?
Professional Answer
View our answers!
Upgrade
Upgrade to view Answers
Question 19 of 30
Tell me about your experience working in teams.
Professional Answer
View our answers!
Upgrade
Upgrade to view Answers
Question 20 of 30
If you are the first on scene and notice 3 almost fatal injuries, how do you react to each patient before help arrives?
Professional Answer
View our answers!
Upgrade
Upgrade to view Answers
Question 21 of 30
Why do you want to work for our organization?
Professional Answer
View our answers!
Upgrade
Upgrade to view Answers
Question 22 of 30
What are your career goals?
Professional Answer
View our answers!
Upgrade
Upgrade to view Answers
Question 23 of 30
How do you fill downtime?
Professional Answer
View our answers!
Upgrade
Upgrade to view Answers
Question 24 of 30
How do you handle situations that could cause you to be tardy or absent?
Professional Answer
View our answers!
Upgrade
Upgrade to view Answers
Question 25 of 30
Have you ever lost a patient en route to the hospital? What happened?
Professional Answer
View our answers!
Upgrade
Upgrade to view Answers
Question 26 of 30
What would your previous co-workers say about your work performance?
Professional Answer
View our answers!
Upgrade
Upgrade to view Answers
Question 27 of 30
How would you rate your skills at creating a patient care report?
Professional Answer
View our answers!
Upgrade
Upgrade to view Answers
Question 28 of 30
How would you handle a situation where a patient has expired, and you have to cover their body and wheel them into the vehicle while a crowd of people watch.
Professional Answer
View our answers!
Upgrade
Upgrade to view Answers
Question 29 of 30
How would you handle a shift when four emergency calls are made all within a two hour time.
Professional Answer
View our answers!
Upgrade
Upgrade to view Answers
Question 30 of 30
Tell me about your previous boss.
Professional Answer
View our answers!
Upgrade
Upgrade to view Answers

User-Submitted Interview Answers

Question 1 of 30
What was your schedule at your last position? Are you okay adjusting to a new shift?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
Between 8 to 12 hour shifts 6 days a week with sunday as my only day off. I am excited to be afforded to opportunity to work a 4 on and 4 off roster with night shifts. Working night shifts is extremely enjoyable from past experiences.
2.
My Schedule was typically 10 hour days, 6 days a week. I am excited with undertaking shift work again, I enjoy working nights and with the lifestyle friendly roster.
3.
My last schedule consisted of 6 days on and 3 days off but with a lot of on call shifts. I am 100% willing to adjust my schedule.
4.
My schedule was Monday to Friday, but part my voluntary work involved covering night shifts, so able to adjust tp different shift patterns.
5.
I worked whenever they needed me. I am okay adjusting to a new shift.
6.
The schedule of my last position was days. I would be okay with adjusting to a new shift.
7.
I did not have a regular schedule. I flipped between night and day shifts with several different start times and many shifts were on call basis. I have no problem adjusting to a new shift.
8.
I worked a 4 on 4 off rotation with each rotation being 3 days and 1 night. I am open to working any rotation.
9.
I currently work for the ambulance service as an emergency care assistant. My rota is made up of different shifts including early, late, night and weekend shifts.
10.
I worked on a casual basis. Was always happy to fill any shift whether it was a morning or an evening shift.
11.
I was on call in my last job, it was important to be prepared to be available when required and not schedule social activities on the days that I was on call. I have had to adjust to new schedules every semester for the past three years at university and am flexible enough to change my timetable to what is required.
12.
My typical working week involved doing 3 12 hour night shifts. There was no set pattern to the days I worked, but generally I worked every other week end. Also when required I would do extra to help the team.
13.
I worked different days everyweek over the summer, between 8-10 hour days, and I have worked shifts in previous jobs. So yes, I can adjust to new shifts.
14.
I was working 7 days a week and on call 24 hours a day. I am looking forward to a new shift and a changing work pattern.
15.
My schedule is 4 days on, 12 hour shifts and 4 days off followed by 4 nights on etc.
Question 2 of 30
What are a few traits you think a paramedic needs to have?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
To be responsible, honest, knowledge, patience, compassion, awareness, ability to perfrom under pressure.
2.
Compassion, integrity, team leadership, good management skills and be able to think outside the box.
3.
Responsible, honest, capable, caring, professional.
4.
I believe a paramedic needs to be able communicate well with pts as well as be a very strong pt advocate.
5.
Patience, dilligent.
6.
Determination, work well under pressure, honesty.
7.
Integrity, self confidence, empathy, ability to take orders but also able to work independently, lead and direct others, to stay calm during stressful situations..
8.
A few traits a paramedic needs to have is that of patience. Patience goes a long way with many kinds of patients, such as children, mentally ill, the elderly etc...Being able to be patient with the patients will ensure trust with them which leads into another trait a paramedic must have. Trust will ensure the best patient care given. Without trust the patient may be unwilling to be treated but if you walk into a room with confidence trust follows.
9.
Compassion, understanding, empathy, motivation to learn, knowledge.
10.
Listening skills, compassion, integrity, sense of humour, adaptability, flexible.
11.
You need to have empathy, you need to be good, good people do their best, try hard, and follow though. You also need to have a "take charge" attitude. Handle responsiblity well, and be very organized.
12.
Compassion, pride, strength, eagerness, trustfulness.
13.
Professionalism, honesty, respect, loyal, dependable, team player.
14.
Good communication, a general respect for people, integrity, passion and a good foundation of clinical knowledge.
15.
You would need to be able to remain calm in a crisis situation.You would need to be highly skilled and be able to make proper decisions and to be able to be reasuring to your patient and there family members and be able to keep your emotions hidden.
Question 3 of 30
How would you handle working with a teammate with less experience that caused you to carry the workload?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
Very politely explain how and why things should be done a certain way, and reinsuring him/her that we are a team.
2.
I would speak to them about the situation and let them know in the best, most professional manner that these issues have been bothering me regarding the lack of team work and ask if there was anything I could do to help. I would remind them that we are suppose to be a team and that I really enjoy working with them and would like that to continue into the future but that they would have to contribute a little more to make it a team effort.
3.
Talk to a supervisorr.
4.
I love coaching and teaching. I have also learned how to teach passively as to not make it seem like I am forcing remediation on some one.
5.
I would talk to my partner, and help him in the areas he/she was struggling to help them improve their skills.
6.
First I would try to instruct the teammate by example and guidance.
7.
I would just compensate for the shift and discuss the situation at the end of shift, firstly with my crew mate and then with my team leader if necessary.
8.
I believe that we are a team, we are in this career to learn and to help others, I would help them (my partner). I would take the initiative to help them work as a team to get to know what I would need done.
9.
I would have a serious discussion with that workmate and partnership and what I expect to occur during a call and discuss what they expect from me. It is always hard to switch partners but I believe you should have this sort of discussion before you even go out on calls when you are starting with someone new.
10.
I would approche my supervisor and request some suggestions.
11.
I would raise this issue with my teammate first and explain in a professional manner the situation at hand. I would then ask if my teammate was performing as such for any particular reason and if they would like to run through any skills which are causing grief.
12.
I would talk with my partner to see if there is anything I could do to help them but most of all I would continue to do what I am trained to do.
13.
I would talk to him and help him practice the skills he was not up to par with and encourage him to not give up.
14.
I would certainly sit down and talk to them about it first. If they needed more skills training I would make sure that they would receive it. If it is a conflict of personality that cannot be resolved this way I would take it to the supervisor.
15.
With good communication at all times. If this was a person who needed to be given instructions or delegated to in order to achieve what we needed to during that shift, then I would give clear and concise instructions whilst also asking for their opinions to maintain and equal balance.
Question 4 of 30
What can you bring to the job that exceeds what other candidates can bring?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
Extreme dedication and participation with great social skills.
2.
I have a lot of related training from being involved with the fire department, Iam professional and dedicated to obtaining more training.
3.
I am an old lady and I will chuckle and calm people.
4.
My willingness to do my job and do it well, work is called work for a reason and I believe I should always be giving 110% when it comes to the lives of others no matter who they are, what time of day or how many hours I have already worked.
5.
My Training, experience, compassion and love of this career will definitely set me apart from the other candidate as weell as my life experience.
6.
I have the ability to easily adapt to difficult situations.
7.
Integrity. Integrity is huge for me. I was grown up on it, and I continue to live by it.
8.
Compassion. I am able to genuinly care about my patients and connect with them to make them feel supported and relaxed during my time with them.
9.
I am currently doing a coop in the medical field which I think gives me a leg up.
10.
I am a very calm and clear headed individual who can deal with stressful situations. I believe I show the qualities of a paramedic such as offering empathy to patients who are in a tough place. I am very punctual.
11.
I consider myself to have plenty of life experience being 49, a mother of 3 and Carer to my 2 elderly patients prior to their deaths.
12.
Patient advocacy and the experience needed to become a knowledgeable paramedic.
13.
I can promise that I will work the hardest I possible can and would not take any easy way out and cutting corners.
14.
I have an eye for detail. I also have a very high compassion for people, but even with that I am able to do my job and keep a level head in any situation.
15.
I have life experiece as well as personal experience that others may not have. I have had other careers and know now more of what I want in life as opposed to those trying this as their first career.
Question 5 of 30
What motivates you?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
The compassion I have for people in their time of need.
2.
Being a lifeguard for many years made me want to tank my patient care to the next level.
3.
I was raised to be compassionate and helpful to others.
4.
I have always wanted to since I can remember, either as a paramedic or a police officer. I believe I will get a sense of fulfillment within myself. Knowing that I have helped others will give me a feeling of achievement and acommplishment.
5.
I have always had the desire but it was during a red cross deployment in 2005 to hurricane Katrina that I realized I truly have a passion to help people.
6.
I wanted to help people because I like it. The gratitude and thanks and the APPRECITAION is overwhelming to anybody. There are several people out there that really do think that you make a defference in there lives and that part is awesome.
7.
I've always wanted to help people.
8.
I needed someone to help me when my father was dying. I want to do that for others.
9.
I have been taking care of people my whole life it is what I do and who I am.
10.
Helping people was something that was instilled in me at a very young age. Growing up going through the different levels of scouts and constantly being out helping the public has made me come to love the feeling you get when you help someone. As a paramedic the feeling continues when you help someone when they need it most.
11.
It has always been in my nature to want to help people.
12.
I can honestly say I have always had it in me to want to help people, it may be a calling in life but the strong sense of community I have within me and the want to help our most vulnerable in the community makes me strive to help people as often as possible.
13.
I have been a part of community programs since I was a child. A member of the Girl Guides and eventually a St John volunteer. Through these organisations I have been able to grow my ability to reach out and help people in need.
14.
The satisfaction of helping others and making that very small difference to their lives.
15.
I have enjoyed working in the customer service industry for a number of years now and ski patrolling allowed me to get lots of skiing done, aswell as being able to help people who were in trouble (which is something I have always had an interest in). I like the fact that no two days are the same, and the fact that you can make such a difference to people lifes.
Question 6 of 30
Tell me how you remain calm, in detail, during a crisis?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
I stay focused on what my plan is and what my next step is going to be. If something doesnt work then I move on to plan b without hisitation or frustration. I also dont let others influence me on a scene I just worry about what I am assigned to do and what needs to be done and do it.
2.
Assess the situation, knowing all my options, taking my time while blocking out all distractions.
3.
I asess the situation and accept it for what it is. I then preced with a level head, if I do feel myself getting anxious than I take a moment to just breathe and then carry on. Often your calmness can rub off on others.
4.
By concentrating on the job at hand and coming up with a plan to deal with the situation.
5.
I think positively and dont panic, I dont think about the crisis going worng I think of it going right and get on with it.
6.
Respirar calmadamente, cerrar los ojos, contar hasta 10. Caminar.
7.
A quick reminder that it is the patients emergency, no mine, take a deep breath and move forward.
8.
Whenevr something gets tough. I try and take it as a challenge. I am a firm beeiver that if you want something bad enough in life that you will get it with hard work. With that being said a crisis is not much more difficult then a challenge. Do what you are trained to do and keep calm and utlize your witts.
9.
Switch my emotional feelings off and stay in practical mode, dealing methodically with what needs to be done.
10.
I stay focus and meditate on what steps I need to take in order to overcome the crisis.
11.
In a crisis I tend to act in the moment and do what is necessary to get a good outcome. I remain calm by having perspective about whats happening. I concentrate on breathing slowly to put my mind and body at ease. I maintain a cool and level head in the situation to maximise my efforts for helping other.
12.
I remain calm in a crisis by thinking off how it would effect others around me. There is a time later to panic but not right now.
13.
Take a deep breath, count to three, have a look at what is going on and start from the beginning again. Start from airway, breathing and circulation.
14.
I take in all the information available to me and assess what needs to be done first. I draw on all my past experience and put it into practice. I learn from my mistakes and ask for help where needed.
15.
I take a deep breath and I speak in a firm calm voice and keep my mind on the task at hand and encourage those around me to follow steps if I know what im doing and treat the "customer" and family with compation.
Question 7 of 30
How do you handle death?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
With a great deal of respect. I understand that we need to make clear to the deceased family that the pt has passed but as a health care provider we must so compassion, and respect to everyone involved. And as far as how I deal with the death, well, it is a part of life and knowing that I did everything that I could to help the pt allowes me to accept it.
2.
Say a prayer, and understand that it is a natural occurance througout life.
3.
I try to remain calm and deal gently with the family and listen to them. If the patient dies under my care, Iknow that I did everything I was capable of doing for them.
4.
Its a tough thing to encounter but I understand that it happens frequent and as a paramedic you will usually see it often. Its important to understand that it just happens and thats life and you have to deal with it however you can.
5.
Admittedly death is an emotional aspect of life to go through with anyone. But keeping an sensitive but pleasant mood around those who have lost someone is the key if they are feeling upset from the passing.
6.
Death is inevitable. It happens and there are not only medical, but logistical obligations that are required. I am not particularly moved by a death of someone I didn't know. I do my job, follow my procedures, and offer my condolences to nearby family. Professional but aloof.
7.
Better than most people I think. I have always been fascinated with death however, not in a way that distracts me from my duties.
8.
I have my own religious beliefs on afterlife, so I can take heart in those. I know biologically its just the last part of the life circle, and emotionally I can seperate my self at work from my life at home.
9.
I handle death the best I think anyone can. Shiw compassion and empathy towards the family. Be respectful and courtesous. Unfortuntly death comes to us all however with us being in EMS we are going to experience it more then anybody else. But since I have seen death I am not afraid of it but rather it s a reminder of how preciuos life can be and dont take it for granted and lfe your life to the fulllest.
10.
With empathy, offering emotional support where necessary and proving practical support and dignity to the deceased.
11.
When encountering death in the field, I handle it the best way I know how - with compassion and respect to the family for their loss. Throughout the situation, it is important to remain professional and follow protocol.
12.
As an unfortunate, but natural event in life worthy of sympathy and sensitivity.
13.
I am a strong believer that everything happens for a reason and when someone dies I believe it was there time to go and that it has to be accepted. Everyone has there time and there is now.
14.
I am human and how does anyone handle death? I think we handle it the best we can. We remain professional and respectful and compassionate the family. Its always difficult to lose a patient, but as long as I did all I could do to help them I handle it well, I find it a privilege to be there with them as they pass. And I take every opportunity to make their passing easy if I can.
15.
Better than most. I have had many close deaths in my life and I respect the grieving process. You can not rush it, and evertime it is different but you need to keep in check while going though the steps.
Question 8 of 30
How do you build relationships when you join a new team?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
Listen to them at all times and respect them and their advice and opinions. Ask their advice if I was unsure about something. Work hard and always be prepared to help my colleagues.
2.
: being social and asking about their experience, their techniques, and showing that I am willing to take advice.
3.
By being myself and doing the job to the best of my ability.
4.
Always work to the best of your ability, always take on board their opions and the advice they offer you and when working with your partner be respectful so that you can work as a team. Be prepared to learn, everyone makes mistakes so be prepared to learn from those mistakes particularly listen to those who have been doing the job longer than you!
5.
Listening to them and being there after difficult calls. Not putting them down if they do something wrong but coaching them.
6.
Introduce yourself to your new workmates, listen, and show that you are part of the team without trying to take over. Communication is key also.
7.
I would make sure that I prove myself to my teammates, and also not let anyone walk all over me. I would stand my ground, do my job promptly and efficiently, and communicate with all team members.
8.
I know stepping into the fire service that you ar the lowest man on the totem pole. If you want respect then you have to earn it. Firstly you need to know your stuff as a paramedic, secondly don't be cocky and thirdly help out and go above and beyond your duties to that station.
9.
Hard work and practice, working closely with more seasoned or experienced paramedics. I would keep practicing skills and demonstrate my abilities and ask for assistance or confirmation that I was performing the skills properly.
10.
Listen and learn and take part in activities only when fully confident.
11.
Listen and respect their opinions. Taking criticism and basically being a sponge learning all I can from someone who has been in the field longer.
12.
I have had new jobs many times in the past and personal connections come easily to me. Reading social situations and doing my part go along way in making posivite impressions. I am also understanding that I need to prove myself and will do so.
13.
Doing my job to my fullest potential, asking for help when needed, and always be ready and willing to work.
14.
To be a work colleague that gains respect from others means I have to be respectful to them. I think if I reflect my true personality of being friendly, caring and positive then respect will be gained alongside my work. In my role I need to prove to others that I am hardworking and diligent in a professional setting.
15.
I would be respectful and open to there advice.. I would also get in there and do my job to the best of my ability.
Question 9 of 30
How would you intervene with a frantic relative who is grieving over the injury of a child?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
Tell them that they had done the right thing calling you (assuming they had), that the child was in good hands, that the child would be calmer if the relative appeared calmer and give the relative a job to do/focus on instead of flapping around.
2.
Provide compassion and empathy towards the relative whilst comforting and reassuring them.
3.
Attempt to calm the relative by exaplaining that the child has/is receiving treatment but we need them to calm down so we can do the best for them. Try to use relatives who may be around to calm the frantic person down-this may work better as its a person their comfortable with.
4.
Assure them that everything that can be done is being done, and display compassion. Say that while I can never feel the way that you do right now, I am doing everything to the best of my ability to help your child, and that if you try to remain calm the child will be calmer.
5.
Attempt to calm the relative down explaining that their reaction will affect how the child responds. May have to have your partner take the relative aside and try to calm them down while you treat the patient. Give the relative a task such as tracking down medical information/medications or otherwise giving them busy work to distract them.
6.
I would take them aside and explain to them that the child is in good hands, and that everything possible will be done to help them. The best thing the relative can do for the child is to remain calm and reassure them.
7.
I would spend very little time on scene to get the child to the hospital.
8.
Show compassion and empathy for what had hapened. Any injury that involves a child is signfifcant. Offer to do what ever you can to make the situation better.
9.
Ask them to remain calm and give them an updated status on what they are doing to their child to help him.
10.
I would try to talk to the family and reassure them that we are doing everything in our power to help the child and that he/she is in good hands.
11.
I would pull them aside and calm down the relative, letting them know that the calmer they stay the better the outcome will be. Inform them that being calm will calm the child down and will help the situation.
12.
I would talk to the relative and be very compassionate towards them. I would tel them that we are doing everything that we can for their child and that he/she is in really good hands, and that the best thing for him/her is to get her to the hospital quickly and calmly.
13.
As a paramedic I feel that we have an inherent trust with the public. That, in combination with a strong personality that demonstrates confidence and competence allows me to speak to the relative and explain how we are going to help the child.
14.
I would either pull her aside or have someone else pull her aside to comfort her and remove her from the situation. I would do my best to tell her that we are doing everything we can, or possibly give her a task to do to keep her mind off of the child.
15.
Respond to them calmly and tell them that you know what you are doing taking control of the situation and calming them down, possibly move them to one side.
Question 10 of 30
Have you ever suggested a improvement that was put into practice in the paramedic field?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
Possibly having a hotline to call if there are any ?âs about a situation keeping it annonymus with out feeling embarressed.
2.
Publically by maintaining high standards of uniform dress, vehicle presentation and equipment supplies. Internally, structured training programmes with a definitive progression pathway.
3.
Well EMS is professional in my opinion, but if iI had to say one thing, I would say that we could be integrated into the community and hospital more.
4.
Study hard, have more training.
5.
If they develop a college of paramedicine, a overhead regulating body that recognizes us as professionals and as an essential service.
6.
The Ambulance Service is ever changing to meet the needs of an ever changing society. I feel that one of the ways to give a more proffesional perception of the Ambulance Service in the United Kingdom is to minimise the use of private ambulance services in the United Kingdom to reduce spending, invest more heavily in NHS services and to ensure that correct levels of training are given to crews.
7.
Education and training. Good supply of equipment and uniform. Under no circumstances any ems personal should be working with scruffy uniform or kit. More strict guidelines and back up(support) to staff.
8.
By becoming self-regulated by a professional college of paramedicine.
9.
The way we are seen in the community. We need to look sharp and act appropriately.
10.
I think more training and physical fitness.
11.
Hi there, after reading this amazing paragraph I am too delighted to share my familiarity here with colleagues.
12.
Becoming more involved with the community they work for.
13.
These are truly impressive ideas in about blogging. You have touched some pleasant points here. Any way keep up wrinting.
14.
Becoming part of a professional organisation and following a strict code of conduct.
15.
Maybe in the way some of the people approach patients. I think if you get into this career you need to know how to balance compassion and respect and professionalism.
Question 11 of 30
How do you resolve conflict with co-workers?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
Prepare myself mentally, and understand that im not the only one in the stressful situation.
2.
By working through it, no matter what needs to be done. Sometimes it's simply remembering to breath, sometimes it is taking control of a situation and calming everyone down.
3.
Try to neutralize the stress and if it becomes dangerous I leave it to whatever police force is in town.
4.
Try to remain calm, step back mentally (and possibly physically), and reassess the situation. Freak out a little on the inside but try not to show it on the outside as your demeanor can affect both your partner and the patient.
5.
The way I handle difficult or stressful situations is through debreifings and excecising.
6.
Use my best judgement at the time by remaining calm and patient. Afterwards, I would go over the scenario in my head giving myself feedback and what I could do better next time around. I will also talk with others, my superiors as needed to become better able to handle it next time.
7.
Take a moment to think things through and not be pressured to take a course of action youre not sure of.
8.
I would prioritize the situation. Take note of what needs to be done, what order it needs to be done in, and I would also make sure everyone knows where they need to be and what they need to do.
9.
Stop. Take a breath and try to logically structure the situation in to something more manageable. Determining what the stressors are, how they can be minimized and prioritize and plan the actions that need to be completed.
10.
I would relax and remember my training. I would do my absolute best to stay calm and do what I am trained to do.
11.
Depending on the situation, you cope differently. I would take a breather, pray, and talk out the situation with someone.
12.
Stay calm, check the status on of the situation and know what are my steps and plans.
13.
Remain calm and know the steps to take.Accept the situation.
Question 12 of 30
24/7 operations are like relay races where you take the baton, run with it and then pass it on smoothly. How do you make seamless transitions on shift changes?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
Be prepared for the incoming crew. Ensure the ambulance is clean and fully stocked. Arrive early so that shift changes can take place on time, still leaving you enough time to check the ambulance and be ready to go if you get a call.
2.
Ensure the vehicle you hand over is in a resonable state and if there is time restock it.
3.
Arrive on time, give report to your replacement, make sure my unit is left in good condition.
4.
Iake myself very flexiable and adapt with the changes.
5.
Give report when the reciever is ready to listen. Give enough information to clearly relay any important messages while limiting extraneous information.
6.
When coming to the end of your shift, bare in mind its not over untill the new crew have taken over. Make sure to leave ambulance stocked and clean as if you were the one to take over.
7.
Show up a little early for your shift for rig check and to receive any information from outgoing crew. When you are the outgoing crew, leave rig in a better state than you found it. Communicate with incoming/outgoing crew allowing a smooth transition.
8.
Insure the equipment is fully stocked. Let next crew know about any problems with the vehicle etc.
9.
When passing on a patient, do it in a safe as possible environment. Have the patient in relatively stable condition. Communication is key. Be thorough and clear when relaying information of a patient and make sure to include any details that may be important to the situation.
10.
Making sure the vehicle is clean and fully stocked for the next crew so they need to do nothing but check it out and go. Update them on anything they need to know etc.
11.
I make transitions very easily. I take note of where things are at, what needs to happen next, and what needs to be done so that the next person can step in with ease.
12.
Communicate about your day report any damaged equipment, keep the truck stocked so its ready to go.
13.
I run download about how shift went, any problems with station or unit. Let them know if supplies are need or what.
14.
Ensure the ambulance is fully stocked and clean; prepare for incoming crew. Arrive early so that shift changes can happen on time and with a proper pre-call check completed.
15.
Have a systematic transition. Always thorough, have clear communication.
Question 13 of 30
What gives you the greatest joy as a Paramedic?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
The respect and gratitude received by strangers, and the challenges it brings you.
2.
Knowing that you are able to help in an emergency and being able to reassure those in distress is rewarding in itself.
3.
Being able to possibly save a life. And fulfilling a childhood dream.
4.
Explaining what is happening in a hectic situation to a Pt. Most times, medical professionals forget to take anxiety out of the situation for the Pt. This can alleviate perceived pain and allow them to cope much better.
5.
Helping people. Trying to be the best thing about that person's worst day.
6.
Knowing that what I do makes a difference.
7.
Seeing the joy on the patients face or that of their family members when I leave the room because I was able to make a bad situation for them just one ounce better.
8.
Helping someone to have a better life and helping their family and friends.
9.
Seeing a person come back to life.
10.
Being able to deal with a situation and expect no mater the out come people involved are left with a positive impression.
11.
Helping people, saving their lives, seeing them smiling.
12.
The knowledge that your helping others in their greatest time of need. Your that beakin of light and hope that things will be ok.
13.
Hearing that a patient I attended has made a recovery. Knowing that I am making a difference to people, however small that may be. Working within a community.
14.
Helping people, making them better hoping to help create a better and healthier world.
15.
Knowing that I have been part of pre-hospital treatment and being the first on the scene, getting to know the patient first and being able to the patient at ease before hospital admission.
Question 14 of 30
What drew you to emergency medicine?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
The opportunity to have a rewarding and respectable career while learning how to stay healthy myself.
2.
Medicine always intrigued me in the sense that you can offer assistance to another human being when they need it most. Emergency medicine really appealed to me as you can help in the most critical moments being able to bring order to seemingly uncontrollable chaos.
3.
Ever since I have been in the fire service I have been intrigued with the medical side of things. I have always enjoyed helping my patients and being completely confident with my work. I like to know that my patients can rely on me 100%
4.
I have always loved helping people.
5.
The idea that I can help people even just one person would make going to work that day enough for me, I would not like every day to be the same. I don't like being in one place for long periods of time.
6.
In the beginning it was not the idea of helping people. My EMT-B class was mandatory in order to take Firefighter 1
7.
Initially it was the needing to be able to do SOMETHING in the event of an emergency. Now its the diversity. One minute I get to play trauma surgeon, then anestesiaologist, then I get to be a hospice nurse holding grandmas hand.
8.
I was drawn to emergency medicine because I want to help people in their greatest time of need. When someone is in a situation where their copping mechanisms are no longer functioning, someone needs to be there to render aid and support and that is exactly what I want to do.
9.
3.Can you relate to us about your first experience as a paramedic and how long have you been in this profession?
10.
The fact that you get to work with other people in crisis situations and being a team player. I like the fact that whenever somebody is in real danger and it os overwhelming themselves that they call for a paremedic and are releived once they get there because they know that they can count on you for saving somebodies life.
11.
Why do you want to be an emt?
12.
My passion for first aid and the amazing feeling you get from helping people who need it the most are what drew me to become a paramedic.
13.
Providing first line medical help to people who are in need of help physically and emotionally.
14.
Being able to provide first line help and medical treatment in situations of stress and emotional strain.
15.
It was truly serendipity. I used to be an art major, and while walking to class I saw the paramedic students out side running their simulations. Suddenly, it was if a brick fell on my head and I decided that I was going to do it. I took my first responder course over that summer and I fell in love with EMS.
Question 15 of 30
Tell me about a mistake you made at work. How did you handle it?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
Being the senior emt with only 3 months experience. Having to backboard a fallen pt. And do every task because of my inexperienced partner.. I stayed calm, knew my options and had my partner assist me to the best of his ability.
2.
I have delt with many incidents under pressure, one being during my job. When I was lifeguarding a women went into an epileptic fit, I had to reasure her son, and support her head whilst she was fitting, as well as this we had to get everyone out of the pool and call an ambulance.
3.
Last winter I had a patient stop breathing on me. It was a very difficult situation becasue you train for these events through mock trails and what not but then when it actually happens it is difficult to do what is right. But you rely on your training and expertise and you let your witts and knowledge guide you. After a debreifing with my manager and talking to the other medics within our company they said I did all I could do and everything was right.
4.
My wedding! My sister has bipolar and around the time of my wedding she was hypomanic which in turn was causing a lot of stress on the family. She had become very self absorbed and hurtful to family members in this time which was hard for me when my wedding day and lead up to the day was meant to be about me. There were stresses related to decisions about whether we should admit her to hospital the night before the wedding which was emotionally draining and some what challenging to contemplate.
5.
We were working an event for my company there was a man who became hypoglycemic and needed help immediately. Me and my team were able to provide the man with symptom relief and get him to a hospital for more definitive care.
6.
I attended an emergency at an airfield and due to the nature of the emergency I needed to see all of those people aboard the aircraft. They were all more superior than myself and did not consent straight away. I was under a lot of pressure first of all to attend the emergency quickly with all the kit I required. Secondly, I had a duty of care to those who refused my treatment so I managed to convince them to be seen.
7.
Flyers had the wrong time on, I coordinated team to provide tea coffee etc.
8.
I was in charge of serving cocktails for a charity fundraiser event. It took place on a train. I had to buy the ingredients and mix it whilst on a moving train. I then had to instruct my coworkers to distribute the drinks to the right cabins. Non of us had had previous serving experience or training. i was also head of marketing for my Young Enterprise Company. I had to set up a website and multiple social media accounts displaying our product in a limited amount of time.
9.
When learning to operating heavy machinery I was required to perform a task I was unfamiliar with, I calmed myself, took a deep breath and ran through the steps in my head before proceeding . I kept myself very aware of my surroundings to ensure I had not missed anything and proceeded with the task. Once completed I checked in with the other operator to ensure I had done it properly.
10.
I completed a degree at university by working and studying myself. I had no direction early in life and struggled to accomplish anything and to work hard and finish a 3 year bachelor degree without failing and getting great marks is a combination of dealing with a lot of pressure.
11.
Meeting tight delivery schedules in the blus light industry.
12.
To convince people to vote for that dissapont them.
13.
Ashamas attck nana, I had to call ambulance. While calming my nana.
14.
Helping paramedics with handover whilst blue lighting a family member to hospital.
15.
Where to start? A recent case involved a neonatal patient who was continuously fitting and in a very difficult to access property with no vehicular access. The required medication would have a high risk of causing a respiratory arrest and the evacuation procedure was extrememly difficult. In order to adequately undertake treamtent, I prepared for breathing asistance and evacuation PRIOR to giving the medication, then supported the respirations whilst taking the patient the long distance to the ambulance afterwards. This was prescient because the baby did indeed stop breathing and I was able to amintain oxygenation until respirations resolved. The pressure here was a frantic parent insisting I ""do something" before I'd even managed to assess them.
Question 16 of 30
Tell me about yourself.
User-Submitted Answers
1.
: perform a scene ssize up. Call for additional resources if needed and perform my initial assement of the pt.
2.
Perform EMCAPIE Environment, Mechanism of injury, Casualty count,Additional resources, personal protective equipment, Introduction, Events Leading up to the situatuion.
3.
PPE, EMCA, Primary, incident Hx, vitals, secondary.
4.
Firstly I would see if the person is ok, I would then roll him/her on their side to make sure that if they was going to vomit they wouldnt choick if being drunk or had drugs. I then would place the person into the van and help him/her from there.
5.
- make sure the environment is safe for my partner, my patient, and myself- MOI- number of casualties- have allied resources been tiered? if not, what additional resources do I need- PPE- look at the general impression of my patient (AVPU? cyanosed? signs of obvious resp distress?)
6.
First step - scene size-up. Determine potential hazards, identify number of patients, verify safety for myself/my team. Second - BSI/PPE minimum of gloves and glasses. Other requirements if need be.Third - Determine MOI or Nature of Illness, Number of Pt, consider additional resources. Fourth - treatment of most sever Pt if number of medics matches the Pt requirements. If not, triage using department protocol. START or other triage.
7.
Check to make sure I am parked in a safe place. Look around to check there is nothing harmful in the place. Go to the casulty and offer my first aid support depending on what is required.
8.
First thing you SHOULD do is check for any danger, anything that could put you as the paramedic, in danger. You should never approach an incident without observing, if you did and something happened to you and/or your partner, what good are you to the patient? ALWAYS check for danger before going any further.
9.
Make sure the scene is safe.
10.
Ensure the scene is safe for myself and my partner to enter. Identify and eliminate any hazards that I can and call for the necessary back up.
11.
Assess the scene, ensure it is safe, see if I will possibly need other resources.
12.
Risk assessment of the environment, count number of injured persons, assess those who need immediate help.
13.
Access the situation, take BSI precautions and proritize your victims.
14.
Assess the situations, check for dangers, secure safety for self, patient and bystanders.
15.
I first establish the safety on scene. I make sure that there are no hidden hazards before I approach. Secondly, I scan the area and establish the need for extra resources if needed. I have to put my personal safety first before doing anything else.
Question 17 of 30
What is your greatest achievement so far?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
Getting into university, getting married, travelling overseas alone, bungy jumping.
2.
My greatest achievement thus far would be getting certified in three states. I persevered through many major set backs and still achieved my intended goal. Nothing else in life gives me as much passion and zeal as working in the medical field.
3.
Qualifying as a Paramedic after 3 years of intense training. Also, completing the London Marathon in April 2014.
4.
Traveling the world and being particularly proud of financially supporting myself whilst I did it.
5.
Completing paramedic program and summer work with coast guard directly following highschool.
6.
Managing to get through the last year. Having had to face great personal and emotional challenges and dealing with some very harrowing situations.
7.
My Greatest Achievement so far has been attitude towards earning a position as a Paramedic. I have taken from previous services I have applied to and have learned to over-come the idea of failure; rather it is not failure, just more opportunity to expand my knowledge base to become the best candidate possible. I have learned to make the best out of each situation. It has given me the opportunity to be where I am today.
8.
Optimized a phone system saving the company $200,000 a year. In the medical field, when I was able to convince a particularly stubborn patient of CO poisoning who was refusing transport to accept oxygen and an assessment so I could stay near and monitor him.
9.
Apart from being a mother of three wonderful sons, I have received recognition for volunteerism and Women of Today.
10.
Completing GCSEs and World Challenge. Being a BRC Event First Aider is also a massive achievement for me.
11.
Working with heavy machinery and never having an accident or incident.
12.
University degree and doing something I really love.
13.
I appeared at accident sciene three people unconcious and I manage to rescue them and there was no lose of life.
14.
When I acheived a medal and certfiacte for being a commited peer support leader which ment I help young yr 9 within the college through there frst year of school and any problems, covcerns o iises they had.
15.
Becoming a qualified nurse.
Question 18 of 30
What part of your duties as a Paramedic do you dislike the most?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
Dealing with people who are ungrateful for your assistance.
2.
I have not come across anything that I dislike thus far.
3.
Most duties of the paramedic can be enjoyed. As long as you adjust your attitude for every call and situation you can find a way to like that situation. With that being said, some situations are more difficult than others. I am the type of person who likes to do things and to stay cuy while im at work. So sitting around to much I get wrestless. Thats why at the station if were in between calls I will wash the truck, scrub the floors, and if theres nothing left to do ill study. I have apps on my phone for quizzing myself and a computer that has unlimited data on it. I liked to do a disorder a day. I would get one of my old teachers to text me a disorder and I would learn about it. Offload delay is a little bit more difficult, it can be for an extremlly long time, you dont want to have your phone out even if it is to learn, because it looks unprofessional and cometimes the patients dont want to be talked to, they want to be left alone. So I thats a good chance for you and your partner to switch eachother out and take a break, get everything ready in the truck, but sometimes theres no much you can do but sit and wait, which for me can be quite difficult sometimes.
4.
Seeing people hurt or distraught. I want to fix things, and sometimes not everything can be fixed.
5.
None, I love all aspects of the job.
6.
Being called to time wasting call outs.
7.
Away from the patients, there has recently been an increase in form filling with procedures a little complicated and ill thought out. Streamlining these would be most welcome.
8.
Sometimes have a chat and laugh in the car, if you need to go over the speed/ go past the red light, you need to focus.
9.
The time wasters, going out to people who abuse the NHS
10.
I don't dislike any of the duties. I suppose if anything its the waiting for another call.
Question 19 of 30
Tell me about your experience working in teams.
User-Submitted Answers
1.
Very well.. Will chip in to do whatever for the team.
2.
I work well in a team, I tend to be the encourager who builds camaraderie and uses humour to keep things positive.
3.
I am a team player and prefer to work with others. Much more can be accomplished with several people working together effectively as opposed to one person trying to do everything themself.
4.
I consider myself to work very well as part of a team. I enjoy working with others and can follow instructions well. When required to do so I can also take leadership and delegate roles in members of a team.
5.
I have always been part of one team or another since a really young age. I really enjoy working as part of a team. Different people bring different knowledge and skills to every team which means you can learn from one another. I believe ever team is only as strong as their weakest link.
6.
I work good in a team as I am a confident women who likes to take the lead within the team but also sit back and listen to others.
7.
I think that I am good at imparting my enthusiasm to others and mobilising them.I communicate well and enjoy engaging with people to achieve a shared goal.
8.
All the professional experience I have has incorporated team work. Giving me several years of experience. At Footlocker as part of the customer service team I
9.
I feel that I am great team member, I adjust well to others personalities and work ethic. Not everyone will be similar, but I do my best to contribute and do my best as a partner.
10.
I enjoy teamwork, I value other peoples ideas and enjoy making group decisions as much as I enjoy making my own. I feel as though I work well in the group dynamic as I can also bring new ideas to the table and I feel as though my personality helps me to work in harmony with other members of staff.
11.
I like to think I work very well in a team. I am extroverted and a people person. I listen to everyones ideas with equal respect and often play devils advocate by suggesting challenging statements to make people think from a different perspective. One time when I worked effectively in a team was when I was team leader on world challenge. Our team had been late getting out of camp and on trek on time for the past 8 days. On my day as team leader, I woke everybody up 10 minutes early, went round each tent to wake everyone up. Told them that if they did not get out of their tent then I would take it down with them still inside. Once everyone was up and out, I then went round asking each person individually over the course of the morning if they had had a good night and if they had any concerns or suggestions. I also made sure everyone drank the compulsory 1l of water and diamox tablet before we left camp. My day as team leader, we got out half an hour early.
12.
I believe I am a great member of a team. I understand everyone is an individual with strengths and weaknesses and will recognise these areas and ensure the team is as strong as possible. Being a team player is critical in this job to succeed and have the best outcomes for our patients.
13.
Understanding and coporative.
14.
I have been apart of many sical teams and competive teams which has meant I have learnt a lot. This I has taught me how to be compassionate. Comsiderste nad communiactewith ithers arund m sso that we can achienve a goal toether awhichw iell befit us all an.
15.
Very well, particulalry if it is professinal and well motivated.
Question 20 of 30
If you are the first on scene and notice 3 almost fatal injuries, how do you react to each patient before help arrives?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
Traige the patients and assist the most sever breathing pt.
2.
Speak to persons calmly, and let them know that help is on the way. Try to comfort the people as best as possible with what is available. ie. Pillows, blankets. Ask each person if possible names to be contacted.
3.
Check if each patient is alive first, and if there is any heavy bleed and try and stop this first .
4.
Prioritise the patients by seriousness of injury and likelihood of outcome, ensure to keep all patients calm.
5.
First of all call for additional resources and then treat patients based on there injuries and who needs treatment first.
6.
Treat the most fatal to less until they arrive.
7.
Triage.. Perform basics and when help arrives send off most critical pt first and then so on.
8.
I would start to triage them as fast as I could and do a very quick look over the injuries. I would have my partner help me after they call for extra backup.
9.
By following the ABCDE approach, using by standers where possible to assist, for example to keep an air way open or raise legs.
10.
Triage the patients using triage cards that are clearly marked so that crews arriving can see them. Delegate once help arrives and in the mean time, attend to the most seriously ill patient, using ABC as a guide.
11.
Triage the patients (using triage cards)to determine the most seriously injured patients before treating any of them.
12.
I would assess each patient with the type of injuries they have and use a list of priority, mainly checking for the casualty which mainly needs medical attention. For example, someone having a cardiac arrest or not breathing will need priority for medical attention to revive them as soon as possible. Any other serious injuries, such as spinal injuries or severe bleeding, the casualty themselves could help themselves, by either applying pressure to the wound themselves or telling them not to move.
13.
I would triage all 3 patients into red tag / yellow tag / black tag categories. If all three patients are red tag, I would look at the most definitive interventions for each patient and work with my partner to get as many of them done as I can--tourniquet bleeding extremities, etc. Unfortunately I might also have to triage my care based on the viability of my patient--all else being equal, of the infant, the 80 year old, and the 21 year old, with identical injuries, the 21 year old is most likely to survive.
14.
Help each patient as quickly as possible just enough to make them stable before moving on to the next.
15.
Assess all three as quickly as possible to prioritise the most severe injuries and if possible check vitals for this person, and then the other accordingly. Supply any help you can until help arrives, including reassurance and instructions to stay calm.
Question 21 of 30
Why do you want to work for our organization?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
That simcoe county Paramedic services originated in 2004, but prior this they were individual services. There is also heavy involvement in the community with PAD programs, and.
2.
I know that remsa covers washoe county through ground ambulance as well as all of northern nevada and northeastern california via care flight. Remsa also is coordinated with special events in the area as well as surrounding areas. Remsa ambulances have an intermediate and a paramedic at most times.
3.
I know that its an organization that prides its self on excellant preformance and community service winning several awards.
4.
You never know what yoou might get.
5.
Great place, great benefits, organized, great training facility, high tech equipment.
6.
You are an NHS Trust organisation, you cover a massive geographical area that includes urban and rural areas, as well as busy motorways. Yo respond to half a million calls per year.
7.
Your organization is one of the best services in the country.
8.
I know that no two days are ever the same and this is the challenge I want, I know you have a very high percentage of students that go onto work within 6 months so the support from the university must be high. I know the ambulance service is a challenging place to work but I will always be learning new things.
9.
IFT is responsible for transporting stable/unstable patients between various medical institutes within your response area, but on the occasion that there is an emergency situation they will respond if they are the closest available unit.
10.
That you provide an Ambulance service to the whole of the East of England, which includes Emergency transportation as well as taking patients to and from different hospitals, and operating 999 call centres.
11.
We are a small community feeding in to the larger urban area which has three hospitals. Education, safety and continued education are three major issues addressed on a continuing basis.
12.
Is life saving organization and is very good.
13.
I understand that the EMS are very orangised with there procedure, systems and rules. This is cruatil because when dealing with somtimes fatl situations it is importanthat thet are otangised so that the paicent can befiti and sat the safest.
14.
Its veyt important to fulfil work load effectively.
15.
Founded in 2001 as Aeromed 365, providing paramedic led bed-to-bed repatriation services on an international scale. Taken over in 2014 by IPRS group and renamed IPRS Aeromed, this allowed an increase in infrastructure and scale, and now includes other specialist paramedic services to be provided.
Question 22 of 30
What are your career goals?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
I have the desire to progress as a paramedic afterwards as I enjoy working in a healthcaring environment, which brings me the opportunity where I can try out new challenges.
2.
I am currently just finished my paramedic program and now looking for my first job. I am new to the EMS world, I have the book work done and just need the chance to get the experience.
3.
To apply to do a BSc in paramedic science in order to gain more knowledge about the job itself.
4.
Hope to stay in this career, maybe eventually work in a support role.
5.
I want to become senior cordinator paramedic.
6.
I hope for this to be a life long career plan.
7.
To work as a paramedic in the NHS and private sectors to greater or lesser degrees.
8.
EMT-P and possibly even community paramedicine.
9.
A higher job of a paramedic, maybe years of experience paramedic qualified.
10.
Hopefully continue as a teacher within the profession to teach future EMT professionals.
Question 23 of 30
How do you fill downtime?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
: studying if I am in school socializing with other ems members, read books.
2.
Playing games on the computer, reading, watching tv.
3.
I would fill downtime by making sure my medic is stocked and ready to go. I would study relative medical material and practice my practical skills as well as my written and verbal skills.
4.
I try to be as productive as possible. I usually do some cleaning that must be done or if I have some down time I play some sports or watch some television. Generally on a day off I do some errands that must be done.
5.
I'd fill downtime by cleaning the base and my truck, by reading my notes, P
6.
Sleep and running after kids' activities.
7.
Keep up with my skills and read. right now, I spend my downtime studying anatomy.
8.
Gardening, reiki, reading, acedemic work, gym.
9.
Reading, and outdoor activities.
10.
I love outdoor recreation. Hunting, fishing, hiking and skiing top those lists.
11.
Cleaning the ambulance, restocking supplies, cleaning the station.
12.
At work I familarize myself on the ambulance loking over manuels and testing and inscting the equipment to make sure it is in top shape. While I am at home I like to keep myself busy by excercising and keeping care of my home.
13.
Relax as much as possible, spend time with partner, friends and family, exercise.
14.
Reading, listening to music, relaxing with friends, gardening.
15.
Making sure truck is stock and looking over protocols to stay up to date.
Question 24 of 30
How do you handle situations that could cause you to be tardy or absent?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
Be prepared for such situations the night before and call ahead.
2.
By calling my supervisor and letting them know what is going on. Also by giving the supervisor as much notice as possible.
3.
I would call my supervisor and inform him why I am going to be late and ensure that it will not happen again.
4.
If such a situation is to occur I would make sure my boss/manager is notified and that there is someone able to cover the shift or till I arrive.
5.
This will depend on the cause of the situation and I would have to ask an interviewer for more information before I was able to answer this question in 450 characters.
6.
DO you best to prevent these situations as best as possible, however, life can come up. When it does, contact those affected by your tardiness, to let them know sooner than later.
7.
How have you responded in the past when your replacement calls in sick and a substitute will take over an hour to come in?
8.
How have you responded in the past when you found another employee was stealing?
9.
Letting my supervisor know in advance.
10.
I try to find my own coverage and talk with supervisor to see if there could be a shift swap.
11.
First and foremost I find punctuality to be of high importance, but on the unforeseen circumstance that may cause myself to be tardy or absent I would notify the supervisor immediately.
12.
Roll up my sleves and get the job done.
13.
Inform your boss or seek permission.
14.
Letting the team know asap to cover your shift.
15.
By limiting their effect as far as possible, including obtaining the appropriate treatment for injuries and by keeping my employer fully informed of any impacts on my work.
Question 25 of 30
Have you ever lost a patient en route to the hospital? What happened?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
Yes, patient had a hearmorrhagic stroke and hypotension, decrease level of consciousness, oxygenayion and ventilation fuilure. Patient was intubate and fluid challenge given, ecg monitoring, patient arrested and was rescussitteted with no sucssess.
2.
No while in my internship we never ran into that but I have lost someone at the home residence before loading them or treating them on the way to the hospital.
3.
I have not lost a patient so far on the way to hospital. I would act calmly and considerately to the member of family who is present and I would not panic or make irrational desisions.
4.
Yes, We had an organophosphate intentional ingestion on a 50's year old man. He had all the symptoms except bradycardia when we found him down in the orchard. We did a quick RSI, then moved him to the rig. As we were transporting his rate dropped then went asystolic despite having pushed every drop of atropine in the rig.
5.
Not en route to the hospital. But I did lose you while taking the patient home back to hospice care. I did what I was trained to do.
6.
No.. Got pt back on scene and pt died after getting to hospital.
7.
I have never lost a patient en route to hospital although I have experienced a patient going into cardiac arrest on scene, before transport to hospital. Full ALS protocol and swift transport followed.
8.
No, luckily we arrived at the hospital just in time to save the patient.
9.
I have yet to be en route to the hospital with a patient due to the nature of my last position.
10.
It's probably unavoidable. In my case, resuscitaiton procedures are well set out and implemented as long as there are no DNAR orders in place.
11.
Well we was continuing resuscitation on are journey, and we had to make a time of death scene. It was sad, very sad, but I had to stay cool and calm.
Question 26 of 30
What would your previous co-workers say about your work performance?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
We have all made mistakes and will continue to do so. The key is to learn from our mistakes and improve ourselves.
2.
I am not a paramedic right now, I hope not too when its with someoves loved ones life in my hands but everyone is human.
3.
I have never worked as a paramedic but on a fire crew yes I have made mistakes but its important to learn from your mistakes and make sure that it doesnt happen again. Its important to stay on top of what your job consists of or you should not be doing that job.
4.
Sadly I have never worked as a paramedic, but I have made mistakes in the past and guaranteed I will make mistakes in the future, to me it is learning from those mistakes and making sure not to make them again.
5.
Yes. I remember missing many IVs, but especially one on a critical patient that had huge veins. I then heard from my preceptor a tip for putting in the IV and since then I have been able to get the IV nearly every time. It pays off to listen to constructive criticism.
6.
Yes I once left a tourniquet on when I was training and a hematoma formed.
7.
I am not a paramedic currently, however everybody makes mistakes now and then but if you have the knowledge and ability do the job properly mistakes would be a lot easier to resist.
8.
I have, and reflection allows for full understanding of any mistake to be made and reduces the possibility of repetition.
9.
I am not a paramedic. Have I ever made mistakes as a basic? Definitely.
10.
A couple, but that's a typical part of the job. I have accidentally made a wrong route to my journey as my msp screen was broken that day, and slow and I didn't realise, I have tripped a young lady up, (once) but she realised it was an accident as I was I'll that day, I went home. But I completely apologised to her, and she laughed, I was upset, but I had to stay calm obviously as a part of my routine.
Question 27 of 30
How would you rate your skills at creating a patient care report?
User-Submitted Answers
1.
Not as good as I would like, my background is with the fire service and the pcrs I usually fill out are not as detailed as an ambulance pcr.
2.
I have been dealing with paperwork for many years and spent the last 6 years working for the college information services department of a busy Fe college, and have experience of writing incident reports during my first aid cover.
3.
I would rate my skills as being excellent, I am very competent at forming reports as demonstrated when I volunteer with St.Johns. I only look to improve these skills.
4.
I feel very comfortable creating Patient Care Reports, after 6.5 years of experience I have solidified a good method that works for me and have received lots of good feedback with regards to my documentation.
5.
I would rate my reporting skills at 9 out of 10 as there is always room for improvement.
6.
I rate my skills as being very good but maybe room for improvement.
7.
I think I am a good carer with my patient's, and I get along with them very well.
8.
I follow what it says and add any extra information to the relevant box.
9.
Good but there is always room for improvement.
10.
I have a great attention to detail.
Question 28 of 30
How would you handle a situation where a patient has expired, and you have to cover their body and wheel them into the vehicle while a crowd of people watch.
User-Submitted Answers
1.
Do it quickly and calmly, maintaing my proffesionalism.
2.
I would ask my colleague to opeen the ambulance and if garda where present I would ask them to keep the crowd back.
3.
Cover with plastic and put them on a stracher.
4.
Ask those concerned to pay respect and move away.
5.
Do it with professinalism. Although many bystanders have not exctly witnessed death before you have. Keep calm show respect and do you job that you were tarined to do.
6.
No problem.. Stay focus and give my condolence to family.
7.
Keep calm and relaxed and deal wit the job in hand.
8.
I would remain calm and professional, try to avoid causing panic amongst the crowd, whilst ensuring the crowd stayed back away from the patient, ensuring the patients dignity at all times.
9.
These situations have to be handled quite delicately, obviously. I would ask my partner to cover the patient while I explained to the family the process by which bodies are taken to the morgue, make sure I have all the relevant information, and make myself available to them for emotional support and to answer their questions. If they ask, I would also give them the opportunity to view the body alone in the ambulance without the onlookers watching.
10.
The situation would have to be handled with a huge amount of dignity and respect for the deceased. I would ensure that all the proper steps had been taken to make this happen.
11.
I would first ask the crowd before leaving the address if they wouldnt mind showing some respect to the patient by turning away and giving ourselves and the family some space. Following this I would ensure the patient was covered to preserve dignity and make a quick transition to the ambulance, again asking people if they wouldnt mind turning away for a moment and offering a few words of comfort to anyone who appeared distressed by the situation.
12.
I would remain calm and relaxed and try not to draw attention to the situation. Asking people to stand back and give the patient some room.
13.
With respect and try not to take any notice of the crowd.
14.
Hi would cover them up giving the dignity and respect.
15.
You make a man wall clear the route of travel to the vehicle.
Question 29 of 30
How would you handle a shift when four emergency calls are made all within a two hour time.
User-Submitted Answers
1.
Undertand that this is part of my job, and take one call at a time, with never any complaints. Remembering to stay focused,
2.
Accept the situation for what it is and continue to go about my job, remembering that such circumstances will ultimately add to my experience and professionalism.
3.
Same as if there were 8 emergency calls. Respond, react, and transport.
4.
You need to be prepare for days like this as a paramedic as you can never predict how every shift will be, it is important to keep the vehicle stocked up and to ensure you have a drink or snack inbetween.
5.
I would focus mainly on patient treatment and fill out the paperwork later. I would make sure in the quick time between the calls I can get whatever supplies out that I can. In these instances there is really nothing else you can do but focus on the patient.
6.
With a relaxed attitude and methodical approach. Only one call can be attended at a time.
7.
Remain calm, assess all situations quick and efficiently.
8.
Estimate each patients emergency and predict how long it would take, if it would take too long call for another ambulance to help out.
9.
I would be lying if I said that I would not be tired, but I would push through giving each patient the best care that I can provide.
10.
That would depend on what the calls were and what was involved. I cannot really answer this question in advance. Each call would be treated on an individual basis.
11.
Take each one as they come until we completed them all.
12.
We divide ourself to the scien of accident.
13.
I would stay calm and understand that there is only so much I as an indicaul could do. I wold alert others and explain the presued situiatin I was in.
14.
Deal with everyone with great importance and take some time out as soon as possible.
15.
By doing one job at a time to the best of my ability, and ensuring that time constraints have zero impact on my treatment of the patient I am currently attending.
Question 30 of 30
Tell me about your previous boss.
User-Submitted Answers
1.
No, I became a Paramedic to help people and to try to make a difference. I realise that this difference is often going to be small - but that it can add up to something that saves lives. Every so often however, you do get to save a life as a Paramedic, and it means a lot to be able to do that too.
2.
Yes and no, that is part of the job but also to make a meaningful difference to people who do not need life saving care.
3.
Helping people is what I love doing, saving lives is even better but I understand this is not always possible, I know you are not supposed to dwell on past scenarios but those are the ones we learn from and may adapt next time we come across.
4.
I became a paramedic to help others in their time of need.
5.
I would like to think I could save lives but I became a paramedic to assist in any emergency and to use my training as needed.
6.
No. I want to help people and saving lives is just an extension of that.
7.
I am not a paramedic yet, I know there is a lot more to being a paramedic than saving lives that is a small part of the role.
8.
Yes and make a difference in the community.
9.
I want to become a paramedic as part of a greater plan to bring more and better health-care to the people of my community. I would save a life if I needed to, assuming that I have the capabilities, knowledge, and equipment necessary. So yes, saving lives is on my agenda.
10.
Of course, not just save lives, and help with illnesses and injuries, but that is a typical job of a paramedic helping people to live..
11.
No. I have saved lives befrore.
12.
I became a paramedic not to save lives. Thats a doctors job. But I did it to be able to provide the best possible care, and chance for lives to be spared by the hospitals.

About Paramedic

November 6th, 2017

Paramedics are healthcare workers who provide emergency medical aid to patients who are injured in an accident or who suffer some type of medical emergency. You are usually the first to arrive on the scene in case of an accident, emergency or any other crisis that requires immediate specialist medical treatment and care. At the scene of the emergency, you administer the appropriate emergency medical treatment after quickly evaluating the patient's condition. You are trained and certified to perform advanced life support (ALS), which includes administering IV fluids, injections, medications and performing advanced respiratory procedures. You may also treat wounds, perform CPR, deliver babies, and perform patient assessments.

As a Paramedic, you have completed approximately 150 hours of training, received your state certification as an EMT-B as well as an additional 1500 hours and a few years under your belt to be where you are at today. As a Paramedic, you are typically the lead member of a rescue team, with the most training and the most decision making power. This means that the requirements to be a paramedic include strong leadership skills and the ability to perform complex life-saving functions in extremely stressful crisis situations. You must keep a cool head and maintain authority amongst your team members in situations where a mistake can mean the difference between life and death.

To prepare for your interview you will want to brush up on your behavioral questions. Your interviewer can see your qualifications on your resume so they will want to know how you interact with your coworkers, patients and how well you work under pressure. Do your research on the company before interviewing. Being able to tell the interviewer how your goals and vision match up with the company will set you apart from the rest. Be prepared to speak to your past work history, education and views on various behavioral questions.

Print all Paramedic Interview Questions